Tag Archives: Doug Pederson

NFL18: It’s Famine State On Franchise QBs As Eagles Have a Field-General Feast

22 Feb

Some call it a quandary, a quarterback conundrum in Eagles-land.

With two 6’5” Pro-Bowl signal-callers likely to be vying for the champion E-Birds starters spot come summer camp, one of them a would-be AP-MVP if not for a late-season ACL tear (Carson Wentz), the other, the reigning SB52 Most Valuable (Nick Foles), Philadelphia’s head coach Doug Pederson looks to have a tough choice on his soon-to-be bejeweled hands.

Pederson & Co. are envy of the League, one where at least a dozen other clubs wished they’d had such a dilemma to deal with this NFL off-season.

But don’t count the Vikings, even as the team Philadelphia vanquished in last January’s NFCC, in amongst the wishers.

With three capable QBs rostered, counting most recent starter Case Keenum, a rehabbed from his most recent injury, vet Sam Bradford (just nine months older than CK) and the youngest of the group, Ted Bridgewater who’ll be entering his 3rd NFL season after having lost the starter’s spot to his own injury and Bradford signing, Minnesota has their own field general quandary to quell.

Contract maneuvers aside, I’d tab Keenum.

Bradford’s always been a skilled pro and mentally focused but is now looking egg-shell and Teddy, in 28 starts (17-11), didn’t appear to have the matriculatory skill-set to move Minnesota into the upper echelon of contenders (28t-22i).

Keenum has 40 starts under his belt (20-19 / 1-1), put up strong numbers in 2017 (11-3, 67.6C%, 22t-7i, 3550y, 7.4 ypc), inspired on an incalculable capability (NFCD18) and is in his prime, having just turned 30 in February (2.17.88).

The Chiefs, count them in with the ‘wish-we-had-more-options’ group.

The sorry state of affairs in quarterback commodity makes Kansas City’s call to part-ways with the capable Alex Smith perplexing. Smith is aging (34 in May) but then so is his former head coach Reid (60 in March).

Alex is a veritable youngster compared to some other NFL stalwarts like Brady (40) and Brees (39) and had a strong 2017, going 9-6 on a 67.5C%, over 4000 passing yards and a super 26-5 TD-ratio. Chiefs lost their lone playoff contest versus the Titans but Smith played his part pretty well (24-33, 264, 2-0, 4sks). Go figure a franchise that hasn’t been to the Big Game since Stram in 1970. And with Gruden back in Oakland-LasVegas, that Super drought may get drier.

For the Eagles part, instinct would have you think an abundance of proven signal-callers in camp is a dicey state best to be avoided, but the NFL does have its case histories showing a wealth of quarterbacks can be a good thing.

The dual QB system was in place with the original Los Angeles Rams from 1949 to 1952, the Bob Waterfield – Norm Van Brocklin dynamic duo producing four NFL championship contests with one title realized (1951).

The 49ers of the late 1980s, early 90s began their dynasty with Joe Montana at the helm and would add Steve Young to the roster for a fifth and final title in 1995. Steve didn’t sub too much during Joe’s reign but they did co-exist on active-duty for four seasons in the Bay City (87-90).

Around the same time as Joe & Steve in SanFran, the Giants had a quarterback tandem of their own going with Simms & Hostetler, Phil leading the New Yorkers offensively in their SB21 (87) win over the Broncos and then had the baton passed to Jeff who called the winning plays in SB25 against the Bills.

So it’s been done before, the duality thing. But the player contracts will control. The broad-strokes: Wentz signed a 4-year deal in spring of 2016 for $27M, Foles a 2-year term in early 2017 for $11M.

Barring the bizarre like player holdout or a contract-term permitting Philly to avoid the dilemma and part ways with one of their two starter QBs before the season begins, both men will be rostered for the entirety of 2018-19.

But whether it’s the rostered versus trade-bait or starter versus sideliner debate, Nick Foles should get the nod in either discussion.

For starters (no pun), the man is no playoff fluke.

Foles has earned his spurs, not only of the post-season variety but has proven himself to be a capable regular season quarterback as well when he went 14-4 on a 62C% as an Eagles’ starter spanning the 2013-14 campaigns.

Carson is younger (25 > 29) but Foles is healthier, has been shipped out of Philly once before (2014), has a regular season career mark of 22-17 (Wentz 18-11), 3-1 in the post-season and is now imbued with the aura of a pro-football Titlist, sans as many as the 352 dimples (Titleist® Pro V1).

It’s all been a bad break for Wentz.

Sure, Carson can wear his Super Bowl ring with pride in knowing he played a big part in getting the Philadelphia Eagles to a playoff position where they controlled their own destiny on home-field and in imbuing his teammates with a confidence, a winning spirit needed to close the deal against New England.

But the knee injury derailed an MVP-like season and it’s the QB who hoists the Lombardi who gets the love. Add to that, we don’t really know exactly how well Wentz will play once he hit’s the turf with his repaired knee. Recent history does bode well, though. showing that the medical community nowadays is doing wonderful things in the orthopedic department as Adrian Peterson can attest.

And maybe Philadelphia goes all in, strategizes like a real champion by taking a page outta’ the old LA Rams’ playbook in implementing a true, dual-QB system. Not so crazy when you consider both their current #1 and #2 quarterbacks are tested, highly capable and have the trust of their teammates.

Bottomline: These Eagles should count their blessings. They’ve already done the unthinkable and achieved the goal of every owner, GM, coach, player and fan in the League: Win the Super Bowl, and did so in besting the best club of the past twenty years. Anything from here on in should be gravy, pure gravy. That means they can roll the dice, take some reasonable risks, keep both Carson and Nick, for a time, see how it plays out and HAVE SOME FUN.

StevenKeys
Photo credit: NFL-symbol.2011.wikiproject; D.Pederson, wc.cca, 1.19.16, PressCon, T.Johhson; N.Foles, SB52-VictoryParade, 2.8.18, GovWolf, wc; C.Wentz, .9.10.17, wc, K.Allison, Hanover-MD: H.Jackson, TCG, 1970
Posted: 2.22.18 @ 3:52pE; Copyright © 2018

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NFL18 Super Cherry Jam: Eagles Win Proves Pocket-Passer Still Surest Route To Promised Land

10 Feb

The Take from SB52? Eagles don’t even get close to the Lombardi trophy with a run-QB subbing for Wentz on short-notice. Not a snowball’s chance in Hades or even the 70° cozy confines of US Bank Stadium.

Pocket-passer quarterback is a rare bird, endangered species in the pros due to emergence of collegian flash-QB, a place where he thrives like a Georgia robin in spring (they move in herds here) under laissez-faire tutelage of Coach-Lite.

But the traditional, stand-tall-in-the-pocket signal-caller who matriculates well past the RIF-stage to read D with proficiency, rabbits as a last option rather than reflex, is still the surest, quickest way to reach that wonderous state we call Titletown, aka, whatever metro currently holds the Silver Swag (Philly).

— — —

Hail the Philadelphia Eagles, coach Pederson, owners Lurie, SB-MVP Foles, regular-season super-QB Wentz, a defense that played well for 18 of 19 games and the rest of the E-Birds rosterees and staff, the 2017-18 NFL Champs!

In besting the Patriots 41-33 in Super Bowl 52, Philly nabbed their first NFL title since 1960, a club led by Chuck Bednarik (D) and Norm Van Brocklin (QB), that topped Lombardi’s first title-game Packers, 17-13.

And what a shocker it was.

Not because these Eagles weren’t impressive all season long, excepting a pathetic regular season finale (6-0 loss at home v. Dallas), but because they finished their run with a back-up quarteback that had started a mere one contest (KansasCity) since 2016 (22-14 career) yet defeated the juggernautious Patriots to do it while Nick’s defensive teammates allowed said New Englanders a whopping 600+ yards in total offense on way to hoisting the prized Lombardi hardware.

Nobody picked Philly to win SB52, nobody who wasn’t a fan, gambler or media hoping for some office bragging rights.

I don’t think anyone, not even Eagles brass and players, saw this kind of time-line for a championship. Maybe in 2-3 more years but SB52? Not on your life.

— — —

It’s the top topic for sportswriters in the days following every Super Sunday: What’s the champ’s template for success? In Philadelphia’s case, there is none. Forget about it. Eagles have no template for Titledom. Doesn’t exist. Nope.

What these present E-Birds DO have is, if not a wholly unique GM / coaching skill-set, a not altogether common ability to accomplish the two following tasks:

1) Execution of draft-picks with a certain wisdom (Wentz); and

2) Rostering a quality back-up QB (Foles), something the Patriots too have shown a panachee for finding (Cassel 10-5 (08) / Garoppolo 7-0 (NE / SF)).

But as important as are those two abilities, the 2017-18 Eagles were recipients of a gift from Lady Luck. That being that they competed in the least competitive NFC in this writer’s recent memory. A tale of the tape:

Giants (3-13): OB was out but we now know TC wasn’t the big problem.
Packers (7-9): Mike dodged one on Rodgers ill-advised return at Carolina.
Seahawks (9-7): Maybe the most disappointing winning-mark this decade.
Cowboys (9-7): Elliott’s on-off susp’n was disruptive but Dak’s still learning
Cardinals (8-8): Loss of star Johnson early-on is big blow cuing Arians exit.
Buccaneers (5-11): Tampa was expected to contend but barely made a ripple.
Falcons (10-6): Defending NFC champs were clearly a lesser grade in 2017.
Lions (9-7): Detroit is becoming the pretender of all 20-teens pretenders.
Redskins (7-9): Like TB, maybe higher expectations are not a good thing.

And yes, the Vikes and Rams infused some much needed competition into the NFC but it hardly made up for the general malaise that permeated, not all that much worse than a rather weak AFC itself in 2017.

It’s not the Colin Kaeprnick effect that explains the malaise. Better chance it’s the plethora of run-QBs, the never-ending flood of poorly-trained, modern single-wing tailbacks masquerading as quarterbacks coming into the League unprepared for the pro-style play. Oh yeah, throw in the mass of DCs who rely on glory stats (INTs / PD / sacks) to stop the score, and not too effectively at that. Translating into most defenders today who couldn’t skillfully tackle an opponent if their life depended on it. There’s that, too.

StevenKeys
Photo credit: NFL-symbol, 2011, wikiproject, 6k; Eagles, SB52-Victory-Parade, souvenirs, 2.8.18, wc.cca, 7Beachbum; SB52, Kitten-Bowl, wc, 2.3.18, B.Allen-VoA; Eagles, SB52, Parade, N.Foles, 2.8.18, PA-GovWolf, wc; Eagles, SB52, Parade, VL-trophy, 2.8.18, wc, PA-GovWolf
Posted: 2.10.18 @ 4:49pE; Copyright © 2018

NFL18 Super Cherry Pick: Triumvirate of Trimountaine, Return of the Prodigal QB and Le Last Quack

3 Feb

Even as the respective player position and team ranks (D / O) figure this SB52 title tussle to be alot closer than gamblers and sabrhead kids predict, it always comes down to the quarterbacks. In Super Bowl 52 that’s TomBrady v. NickFoles. It feels like a no-brainer, but keep your thinking cap on.

Tom’s mantle is laden with NFL accolades. Nick Foles, not so many. But the glitter of gold is sometimes hidden in the recesses, waiting to be mined.

This is Foles 2nd go-round with Philly. His first (2012-14) was a rollercoaster. Baptism by fire in his debut (1-5), in year two he was nearly MVP-caliber (8-2 / 27t-2i). But in his third Eagles season, while quarterback capable (6-2 / 13t-10i), he failed to meet owner and the junior-media expectations, skewed as they were.

Shipped off to the Rams for 2015 (4-7), then KC for another way-stop as Smith’s back-up (1-0), we, and maybe Nick himself, are not really sure WHAT to expect on a rather short 2018 PS run which started on a bye (WC), then a 5-pt. win over the A-Birds (Dvn’l) and the romp over a clueless Vikings club.

And with sore ribs, Foles will be one, unlucky, hard, targeted hit away from handing the reins over to rookie back-up, Redskins 2016 draftee and former Hoosier signal-caller, 6’6” Nate Sudfeld out of Modesto, California.

The Bible tale on the prodigal son and his high-profile return is well known (Luke Ch.15: 11–32). Jesus is said to’ve recounted it to his followers. Ultimately, pride is subjugated, forgiveness given and atonement made. All of which has nothing to do with Foles, except the returning home part. Titles necessarily afford the writer an artistic license with a broad interpretation of its wording.

But remember what that lad from Tremadog (UK) said (Lawrence of Arabia): “Nothing is written.” If Eagles head coach Doug Pederson hoists the Lombardi come Sunday nite in Minneapolis, resurrecting Philadelphia’s NFL championship legacy (60), it won’t be a GREAT surprise.

As long as there are turnovers in football, ANYTHING can happen.

Player notes: Rob Gronkowski has been cleared by the Medicals for contact but the human body has a mind and schedule of its own. Don’t expect big things from party animal in SB52. And Eagles’ RB Jay Ajayi (5.8ypc) is reported ankle hobbled and available but, like Gronk, can’t be expected to be impactful.

Empire Builders and Destroyers of Dreams

All roads lead to Rome. You might’ve heard that one before.

Now, put that ancient Italian-directional-turned-proverb into NFL18 terms: ‘All roads (to Titledom) lead to (Gestalt of Greater Boston and their Patriots).’

You like history? Good.

The ‘all roads’ line came into being as the Great City evolved over centuries time into the hub of planet Earth’s first mega-Empire (241BC – 395AD).

A centralized, metropolis where commerce and civilization constantly converge, Boston came to be known as Hub City for New England and thereabouts.

Beantown was hub of early colonial America north of Maryland until Philadelphia displaced it in population in the mid-1700s. Curiously, its first moniker shares another common call with that former Empire across the Atlantic: The capital of Massachusetts was originally known as Trimountaine, in reference to its three ancient peaks, while the Roman gestalt really began to take off with its First (60BC) and then Second (43BC) Triumvirates.

Making the switch from a Republic into an Imperial (dictator) state, its course was greatly shaped by a set of Triumvirates and the two men who toppled their respective power-shares: The first saw JuliusCaesar muscle Pompey & Crassus out (60BC), the second had Octavian (Augustus) flex MarkAntony and Lepidus into oblivion on way to the Empire‘s zenith of greatestness.

All those histrionics lead up to this pithy remark: Hail the New England Patriots’ Tom Brady, Bill Belichick and Robert Kraft! Okay.

Never in the history of Stateside sportdom has a tightly-woven triad of money (owner), brain (coach) & brawn (player) so effectively organized and implemented an operation of success over such a long period of time and with so little apparent friction as have these three personalities.

— — —

You might say the Philadelphia Eagles wily running-back LeGarrette Blount is having the last laugh. And “that ain’t no joke (“TT” / Reno 911).”

The Eagles 2017 backfield addition had been Mr. Reliable for the Pats for 3+ seasons, rushing for over 1000 yards and 18 League-leading TDs in 2016 and helped NewEngland to two Super titles. For the E-Birds this regular season, he ran for 766y on a spiffy 4.4 average. All of it has helped him fashion one of the most inspirational football comeback stories in recent memory.

Just a few years back things looked bleak for Blount.

A sophomore at Oregon in 2009, his Ducks dropped their opener at Boise State, dashing national title hopes. As the two clubs began to part, LeG was taunted by Broncos’ Byron Haut with great zeal, triggering a grazing blow by Blount in return. In opposite of the time-honored playground standard that holds, ‘He who starts the fight bears at minimum equal blame,’ Blount was instead made scapegoat, given lengthy suspension and saw his Heisman aspirations vanish.

The Buccaneers drafted the Madison, Florida native in 2010 (2R-37) and LeGarrette responded by making the cherished 1000 yard club. But by year three he saw his role and production greatly decrease. In 2013, Tampa sent him to the Patriots who, even on a spiffy 5.0 ypc, sent him to Pittsburgh (2014) only to return to Foxborough that same year to contribute 3-TDs to New England’s playoff run and SB49 win over Seattle. Two years later, Blount rushed for 100+ in last season’s successful playoff run (SB51).

Sometimes le life can turn terrific.

Super Bowl 52 Cherry Pick

Eagles v. Patriots (MN): 2.4 NBC 6:30pE (+): NewEngland

Record: 83 – 62 (7 – 3)

StevenKeys
NFL HunchLine
Photo credit: NFL-symbol, wikiproject, 2011; N.Foles, 12.23.12, wc.cca, T-Sgt.C.Walker, Dover-USAF; B.Belichick, R.Kraft, J.Kerry, 4.25.15, White-House, wc, USDoS; Cherries, Hispalois, 7.2.12, wc, Caceres, Spain; J.Otto, TCG, 1970
Posted: 2.3.18 @ 4:35pE; Copyright © 2018

NFL16: No Herschel Heist (’89), But ‘Holy Crap,’ Vikes!

5 Sep

The Herschel Walker deal. If you followed NFL football 25 years ago you know what those words mean.

The Minnesota Vikings, specifically, their brain-trust of Mike Lynn (GM), head coach Jerry Burns and owner Max Winter, bet a good share of the fjord (farm) on the Dallas Cowboys All-Pro ball-carrier in hopes it would put ‘em over the top, i.e., get the Norsemen back on the Super stage.

The date: October 12, 1989.

The details: Vikings received former Heisman-winner Herschel Walker (UGA), who’d run wild in the defunct USFL (5562 (3)) and vacillated from exquisite to pedestrian in parts of four seasons with Dallas (3), plus four mid-round draftees (J. Reed). Cowboys got five Purple players and an armload of draft picks, most conditional but realized as three (3) 1Rs, three (3) 2Rs, a 3R and 6R., a pool from which toppers Alvin Harper, Darren Woodson and Emmitt Smith were had.

The general impression of the day? Lots o’ shock and a bit of awe.

..........Spielman.wc.8.4.14.M.Deery.wideMy personal take: Gilding the lily or, in those famous words of Elizabethan penmeister Edward de Vere (Shake-a-Spear), the Norsemen were “add(ing) another hue unto the rainbow (King John (1590s)).”

Talented Vikes had been knocking on the door the season prior, making NFCC and taking eventual winner DC down to the wire, unable to punch it in as final seconds ticked off. Darrin Nelson was their top ground-man (6-800 / 4.5+ per) and had a fine QB in Wade Wilson, a stout line (Zimmerman, Lowdermilk & Irwin), All-Pro TE Steve Jordan and all-everything in Anthony Carter. D wasn’t too shabby either with padded-up Pro Joey Browner in the secondary, Studwell & Solomon in the middle and pass-rush ruffians Chris Doleman and Keith Millard.

Pretty nice “rainbow.”

The result: Herschel was competent in his 2.75 years in purple (4.1 (3.2 PS (89))), but then so was Nelson. Some say he wasn’t employed properly. And that’d be balderdash. Imagine Gale Sayers, Chuck Foreman or Jerome Bettis failing to be used properly. Not possible. Hersch was rated the same (1514 (‘88)). When the handwriting was on the wall, Walker ran like he’d hit that wall and showed no interest in scaling it, not in Minneapolis.

Dallas parlayed 3-4 of Minnesota’s umpteen players & picks into key contributors to three Super Bowl wins in the 90s. Good but not a great result, and even then could’ve just as easily produced nothing of serious value.

..........Walker.5.14.10.wc.USArmy.J.VannucciDrafts are always a dice roll, regardless of research and pre-draft hype. Just as often as not, no matter the # of selections, any draft can be a bust, resulting in few or no long-term player benefits for the club.

More than the benefits Dallas received from Minnesota’s largesse, due in credit to the Cowboys and luck, it was the high expectations for Walker, poured by Jones and guzzled up by Minnesota dealers, that went unfulfilled and borne by the Vikings, which constitutes the crux of this historical trade.

And that’s the backdrop for what transpired last week on the NFL wheeler-dealer front, to offer some perspective on Saturday’s surprising Sam Bradford deal engineered between the Vikings current brain-trust in Rick Spielman (GM), Mike Zimmer (HC) and owner Zygi Wilf, and the Eagles inner-circle of Howie Roseman (GM), head coach Doug Pederson and their owner Jeff Lurie.

You can’t say Philly got a Herschel haul like Dallas did, getting two draft picks and cash (1R (‘17) + 4R (18) + $7M ($18M)), or that Minnesota mortgaged their future on the 6th-year signal-caller from OKC, (b.1987) as they did in 1989. But to those fans with a long memory, the vibrations that emanate from this present song will strike familiar flat notes with the former ditty of disaster.

.........Bradford.wc.USEmbassyLondon.thm.10.23.12Sam’s got real upside, there’s no doubt about that.

He’s a quality pocket-passer in his prime, more NFL vetted than was Walker. When healthy, he averages 3500+ pass, C% 60+ and a 20-13 TD-ratio. Not elite #s but solid, enough to help get one to the Conference title.

Bradford’s downside is that he’s injury-prone, beginning at close of his college days in Norman (UO) and a state which has subtracted time from two of his five pro campaigns (2010 / ‘13). One more concern not so easily quantified as injury debits and TD credits is Sam’s leadership level, more specifically, clutch capability. A question (?) mark.

Most perplexing and vexing about Minnesota’s adding Bradford, as too in the Walker case, is its arguable non-necessity. No gilding the lily here but the need is questionable because the quarterback spot appeared already well in-hand with veteran field general Shaun Hill’s patient presence on Vikings’ roster.

Some media report that Hill has been penciled-in as Vikings’ Week 1 starter.

The 10-year QB who’s been clip-boarding and offering insights to the project that has proven to be TD-challenged Ted Bridgewater, had been prepared for just such a circumstance yet couldn‘t have expected he’d be used merely as a bridge-QB, to bide time for a newly signed rosteree in Bradford to get acclimated.

.........Hill.wc.10.4.15.J.Beall.738kLoyalty is no favored virtue today, neither is composure (v. panic), but Hill under center gave Minnesota an experienced, proven presence in what could be Adrian Peterson‘s swan song in Land of 10,000 Lakes.

When given the opportunity, Shaun Hill has proven a quite capable matriculator.

The Maryland Terrapin began in brief with the Vikes in 2005, then moved to San Fran. As a starter for parts of 3 seasons he compiled what could be called an impressive rookie record in W-L (10-6), C% 62+, TD-ratio (23-11) and pass (3400+). That was a 49ers club that, like this current Minnesota group, was building to contendership (Singletary to Harbaugh) while his next stop was in Detroit which hasn’t had an NFL title since Bobby Layne.

As to Mr. Bridgewater, sidelined for the 2016 season with an ACL tear, he’s gotta’ be scratching his head as well.

It’s one thing to have your back-up fill the breach when you go down but to bring in a hired-gun still in prime, that can change the 2017 dynamic drastically, depending on the Vikes 2016 and if Ted returns in-tact, not unlikely given the wonders worked by today’s surgeons (See; All-Day (ACL)).

......Bridgewater.8.4.14.wc.M.Deery.6.5mCommentators must remember to tailor their views in knowledge they are not often privy to all facts and devilish details which imbue these sort of deals (moi). But as that wise Assyrian named Ahikar wrote many centuries ago, ‘a sparrow in thy hand is better than a thousand sparrows flying (Wikipedia)’ or an Eagle who went 7-7 (25-37) with 14 INTs. Put another way, ‘If it works, don’t fix it,’ Mr. Spielman.

If this deal proves a win-win for both teams, that’s just terrific. God knows Philly and Minnesota could use some good fortune.

While Eagles roll the dice in going all-in on rookie Carson Wentz who’s cut his QB-teeth on FCS competition (NDSU), then enticed Vikings to bite by assuming lion’s share of Bradford’s 2016 pay ($11M ($18M)), it’s the Purple who engage a slightly more risky game of chance in the Bradford deal in betting multiple top draft picks in apparent pass on a ready n’ able substitute in Mr. Hill.

Curses don’t exist except in minds of the malleable. The many misfortunes borne by NFL’s Minnesota franchise come not from boogie-men and demonic spells, nor a lack of generally wise management (2009 pick-up of Brett Favre, while costly in salary, proved sage (NFCC10), for a season, anyway), but instead from the lack of two All-Pro virtues: Patience and trust.

Of course, knowing when to make “adjustments (SB4)” and employing the art of tackling (NFCC 1999, ‘01) rank pretty high on that list, too.

......NFL-symbol.wikiproject.6kbSteven Keys
NFL HunchLine
Photo credit: Vikings, wc.cca, wordmark, 2004; R.Spielman, wc, M.Deery, 8.4.14; H.Walker, wc, USArmy, 5.14.10, J.Vannucci; H.Walker, RepPeterson, wc, 5.5.4, wc, PE4Life; Viktor, wc, M.Mekuk, 11.7.10, MN-NG; S.Bradford, wc, 10.23.12, USEmbassyLondon; S.Hill, wc, 10.4.15, J.Beall;
Posted: 9.5.16 @ 2:32am EST; Copyright © 2016